Quick Tomato Chutney – Anglo-Indian Cuisine made perfect

Quick Tomato Chutney - Anglo-Indian Cuisine made perfect - tomato chutney ready to serve #chutney #pickle | hurrythefoodup.com

Have I ever told you how much I love curry? Oh I have? Well then, I won’t bore you with another post about curry. No, I’ll tell you all about curry’s best friend, tomato chutney, instead. Muahhahhah.

So what is tomato chutney?

Chutneys have been around for a long time, and come in all forms and guises. Made from virtually any type of fruit or vegetable, the style of chutney varies wildly. In India, chutneys were often made and eaten fresh with just a little (if any) sugar for sweetness, whereas British style chutneys were often kept preserved for weeks or even months at a time. That preservation required much more sugar, and in today’s industry (India included) many manufactured chutneys contain SO MUCH SUGAR. I mean, seriously. We’re not against a little sugar at the right time (check out the Angry Chef’s investigation if you haven’t already), but in many chutneys nowadays it’s the main ingredient. THE MAIN INGREDIENT! Sure it tastes good, but you might as well buy jam instead.

Quick Tomato Chutney - Anglo-Indian Cuisine made perfect - tomato chutney ingredients #vegan #side | hurrythefoodup.com

So what should a tomato chutney really be like?

What we’re looking for here is to make a chutney based on the best of both worlds. We want something made with fresh ingredients, that’s not sour but a little sweet, and made with only minimal sugar. As always, we want our food quick, and it would be helpful if the chutney would also last in the fridge for a couple of weeks. This is tomato chutney.

Of course, tomato is the primary ingredient here, mixed with a little sugar and some raisins to hit that sweet note. A little chilli give us a hint of warmth while the vinegar makes sure we have a taste of sourness without going too far. The cardamom pods complement everything perfectly.

Quick Tomato Chutney - Anglo-Indian Cuisine made perfect - simmer all the ingredients into a medium heat #tomato #sweet | hurrythefoodup.com

And how do I eat chutney?

Chutney comes from the Hindi word ‘to lick’, and that’s a pretty good place to begin. While I don’t recommend you start licking plates in restaurants, chutney is a great dip for bread, cheese or pickles, and is the perfect accompaniment for any of these ‘finger foods’. I personally recommend any sort of naan bread or poppadoms, flatbread or pita bread. Naturally, chutney goes well with nearly any type of curry, and I highly suggest making chutney the Raja of any curry night. Along with a pint of pale ale, obviously 😉

Quick Tomato Chutney - Anglo-Indian Cuisine made perfect - tomato chutney serving inspiration #jam #spicy | hurrythefoodup.com

And finally

To save future time, make a double or triple batch and seal it in a clean jar (sterilised is best) with a little oil on the top. It’ll be good for a couple of weeks in the fridge. You can also add or remove spices as you like, depending on how strong you like your flavours. And if you fall into that small but vocal group of people that doesn’t like cardamom, swap the pods for a teaspoon of curry powder. If you need a curry recipe itself, then look no further than the incredibly popular chickpea curry. It’s immense. Enjoy!

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Tomato Chutney

Taking the best from both Indian and British chutneys, this Anglo-Indian is the easiest, quickest and tastiest tomato chutney you’ll find on either continent.
Course Appetizer, Side
Cuisine British, Indian, Vegan, Vegetarian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 1 small bowl
Calories 770 kcal

Ingredients

Optional:

  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 handful basil leaves

Instructions

  1. Chop the garlic cloves and the red onions. In a deep pan pour the oil, add the garlic and onions and fry on a low-medium heat until transparent.

  2. In the meantime, cut the ripe tomatoes into small pieces. Add to the pan and fry for two minutes on high heat. Add the raisins, the white vinegar, the brown sugar and the spices: sweet paprika, chopped chilli peppers and the cardamom seeds. Simmer all the ingredients into a medium heat, uncovered for 20 minutes or until thickened.

Optional:

  1. Blend all in a food processor or with a hand blender. Easy.

Recipe Notes

IF YOU LIKE THIS RECIPE: Then you need to check out more of our dips. For example this Romesco Sauce is loads of fun. And if you’ve been looking for a hummus alternative try out this Baba Ganoush recipe!

Thanks Cris for this awesome recipe!

Quick Tomato Chutney - Anglo-Indian Cuisine made perfect | hurrythefoodup.com

2 comments

  1. Thank you for your recipes. I live the honeydue melon soup. Would you know of fruity chia seed desert or pudding suitable to offer a vegan friend?

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