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49 Foods That Start With E (I bet you can’t list them!)

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Whether you’re prepping for a pub quiz, trying to boss an alphabet game or simply out to learn something new, you need to check out this list of foods that start with e!

Title Image - Foods That Start With E | Hurry The Food Up

Before we get into the list, I should define the parameters! What counts as a food and how have I split them up into categories?

Food is anything you can eat or drink. I do not include brands as food names (ie. we wouldn’t include ‘Snickers’ as a food under ‘S’, but chocolate, nuts and caramel could all be listed under their respective letters!). I do include prepared dishes (ie. enchiladas and eclairs).

The categories of foods that start with e that I have found are: whole foods (mostly fruit and vegetables, any single natural ingredient), processed food (I’m talking cheese, pasta), savoury dishes (prepared food that uses multiple ingredients), sweet treats (the same, but sweet) and beverages (no chewing involved!).

I also have separate lists of just fruits that start with e, or just vegetables that start with e!

Get ready to get stuck in!

Foods that start with E!

Whole Foods

Eggs

Eggs are a healthy and versatile food, which can be eaten in many different ways. Boiled, scrambled, poached, fried, mashed in an egg salad, turned into eggs benedict – the list is endless! Egg whites are whipped up to make meringues, and egg yolks are used to make custard!

European Pear

European pear is the standard type of pear eaten across the world. It is thought to be descended from wild pears. We have evidence of the consumption of wild pears as far back as the Neolithic and Bronze Age.

The scientific name for the european pear is Pyrus communis.

Emblica fruit

You might be familiar with the emblica’s close relative, the gooseberry. Emblica is also known as the Indian gooseberry. They have a similar sour flavor.

Emblica are used to make a sweet dish called ‘amle ka murabbah’, which consists of the fruit candied in sugar.

The scientific name for emblica is Phyllanthus emblica.

A wicker basket of emblica berries | Hurry The Food Up

Egg fruit

Weird name right? It’s called egg fruit because it has a texture comparable to a hard-boiled egg yolk – but a very different flavor! It tastes sweet and is used across South and Central America to make jam, pancakes and smoothies.

It is also eaten in the USA, India, Australia and other places.

The egg fruit’s scientific name is Pouteria campechiana.

Elephant Foot Yam

These huge yams are a popular ingredient in Southeast Asian cuisine. There are many curries which use them as a main ingredient. Traditional Indian medicine uses these yams as treatment for piles!

It is also known by its scientific name Amorphophallus paeoniifolius.

Egusi

You only actually eat the seeds of the egusi! However, it is a vegetable, a gourd in fact, native to West Africa. Did you know the egusi is a relative of the watermelon?

The egusi is also known by its scientific name Citrullus colocynthis.

A pile of egusi seeds on a white surface | Hurry The Food Up

Eddo

Eddo is grown in many tropical climates, though it originated in China. It has edible stems that must be prepared carefully to remove the acrid flavor.

Emu Apple Fruit

Aboriginal communities in Australia claim this fruit is tastiest when buried for a day before being eaten! This process apparently enhances the already sweet flavor of the fruit.

The emu apple goes by the scientific name Owenia acidula.

Eastern Hawthorn Fruit

Part of the hawthorn family, this type of hawthorn berry is bigger than other hawthorn fruits. It can be eaten raw, but in the Caucasus it is baked into bread!

It is believed to help treat cardiac and digestive issues – but research is still being conducted into these claims.

The scientific name for hawthorn is Crataegus monogyna.

Three hawthorn berries, one chopped in half | Hurry The Food Up

Elderberry fruit

Elderberry has been used for medicinal purposes for centuries, most famously cold and flu symptoms. But be careful! If you eat it raw, the bark and berries can give you stomach issues.

The scientific name for the elderberry is Sambucus.

Early Girl Tomato

This tomato has been particularly popular with hobby gardeners since its development in the 1970s. This is because It ripens early in the year and has an intense flavor.

The scientific name for the early girl tomato is Solanum lycopersicum ‘Early Girl’.

Ensete

This plant is also called a ‘false banana’ for its banana-esque, but inedible, fruit. The roots are a vital source of food in Ethiopia, which is where it is cultivated.

The ensete is also called by its scientific name Ensete ventricosum.

The fruit of the ensete against an earthy background | Hurry The Food Up

Elephant Apple Fruit

This fruit is grown in China and tropical regions of Asia. It earned its common name because elephants love to eat it – so much so that they are considered a key seed distributor for this plant.

The scientific name for this fruit is dillenia indica.

Emu Berry Fruit

Like emu apples, emu berries are also from Australia. Like elderberry, this plant is used to relieve the symptoms of cold, flu and diarrhoea. It goes by lots of different names, a couple of my favorites being ‘dysentery bush’ and ‘diddle diddle’!

The scientific name for the emu berry Podocarpus drouynianus.

Eggplant

Did you know eggplant is technically a fruit, not a vegetable? Eggplant is also known as aubergine or brinjal. It is used in French, Mediterranean, Middle Eastern cuisine and more.

The scientific name for eggplant is Solanum melongena!

Elands Sourfig

Elands sourfig can be found in South Africa (to which it is native) and, strangely, some parts of England by the coast. South Africans use it to make jam.

The elands sourfig goes by the scientific name Carpobrotus acinaciformis.

A flowering elands sour fig in the wild | Hurry The Food Up

Earthnut Peas

Grown in Europe and West Asia, the tubers of this plant can be roasted or boiled and taste like chestnuts. It belongs to the same family as french beans, green beans and fava beans.

Its scientific name is Lathyrus tuberosus.

Enterprise Apple

The enterprise apple, or malus domestica, was bred to be a good commercial apple. It is disease resistant and can be stored for up to 9 months.

Early gold Mango

The earlygold mango is yet another variety of mango developed and grown in Florida! It goes by the same scientific name as normal mangos, mangifera indica.

Ephedra

Don’t eat this one! It is edible, but it is a stimulant that can cause damage to the heart lungs and nervous system. It has been used for weight loss and athletic performance purposes, but was banned in the US over health concerns.

Ephedra is its scientific and common name.

A pile of dried ephedra on a plain background | Hurry The Food Up

Edamame

You are probably familiar with edamame beans. But did you know they are actually soy beans? When soy beans are harvested before they reach full ripeness, they are known as edamame beans.

Boil them and then salt them for a healthy and delicious snack. Soybeans have many health benefits, including folic acid and immune system bolstering compounds.

Their scientific name is a bit of a weird one: Glycine max (L) Merr.

Entawak Fruit

The easiest flavor comparison for the entawak is a pumpkin! However this fruit can only grow in tropical climates, and is native to Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra and Borneo. You can also toast and eat its seeds, like a pumpkin.

The entawak’s scientific name is Artocarpus anisophyllus.

Etrog fruit

This fruit is a crucial part of the Jewish holiday Sukkot. It is cultivated primarily for this purpose! Its cultivation must be supervised closely by rabbis, so as to ensure that the fruit is kosher. Not many varieties make the cut!

Some people do eat theirs after sukkot (where it is held or waved during prayers, not eaten). It is a citrus fruit, so can be used in a similar way to lemons.

The etrog is also known by its scientific name Citrus medica.

A large etrog leant against a small etrog | Hurry The Food Up

Elephant Garlic

These mammoth sized garlics come from the eastern mediterranean, but are now grown in many different places, including North America. They reach 15 cm in diameter!

The scientific name for this veg is a long one: Allium ampeloprasum var. Ampeloprasum.

Evergreen Huckleberry

This is a type of huckleberry that grows mostly in the Pacific Northwest of the USA and in certain regions of Canada.

It has a sweet taste and many Native American communities eat the berries raw. It is also made into delicious jams and jellies!

The scientific name for the evergreen huckleberry is Vaccinium ovatum.

Edward Mango

The Edward Mango was invented in Florida as a mixture of mango varieties, designed for optimum flavor and disease resistance. Indian mangos were not surviving in the climate of Florida! It is named after Edward Simmonds, the man responsible for its creation.

The scientific name for the Edward mango is Mangifera indica.

Endive

Endives are part of the chicory family. They are small and bitter tasting and resemble a romaine lettuce. They are high in folate, vitamin C and K.

Its scientific name is Cichorium endivia.

A paper bag filled with 5 endives | Hurry The Food Up

Escarole

Escarole is closely related to endive, but looks very different, with broad curly leaves. They have a similar bitter flavor. Escarole is added to pasta and soups in Italy.

Escarole has the same scientific name as endive.

Eels

Eel is a type of fish, with a distinctive long thin body. It is eaten across the world, from England, to Italy to China! You can eat it in a stew, grill it, jelly it or roast it. It is meant to be delicious!

Processed Foods

English Muffin

An english muffin is a small, round, flat bread, usually served toasted with a variety of sweet or savoury toppings. They differ from american muffins, which are sweet cakes, like cupcakes!

Edam

Edam is a semi hard cheese from the Netherlands. It usually comes coated in red wax. Did you know it was the world’s most popular type of cheese between 14th and 18th century, in part because it keeps very well for a long time!

Emmental

Emmental is a swiss cheese that takes its name from the region of Switzerland it originated from. The famous holey cheese from Tom and Jerry is most likely based on Emmental!

Evaporated Milk

Evaporated milk is cow’s milk that has had up to 60% of the water removed. When the water is added back it becomes normal milk again. The idea behind using evaporated milk is that it takes up less room and has a longer shelf life than fresh milk.

A bowl of evaporated milk with a spoon held over it, dripping milk | Hurry The Food Up

Elbow Macaroni

Elbow macaroni gets its name from its bent shape. This is the type of pasta used to make mac and cheese, which is one of my favorite foods!

Prepared Dishes

Egg rolls

Egg rolls are a Chinese-American dish, and a popular starter in Chinese restaurants. They are made from shredded vegetables and/or meat, wrapped in a wheat flour dough and deep fried. Dip them in soy sauce and enjoy!

Escargots

Escargot is the french word for snails, used in English to refer to the edible snails famously served in French cuisine. Escargots are often served in garlic butter.

A bowl of escargots in herbs butter and garlic | Hurry The Food Up

Enchiladas

Enchiladas are Mexican dish consisting of corn tortillas wrapped around a filling and covered in a chili-based sauce. They can be stuffed with many different types of food – meat, cheese, beans, vegetables. Enchiladas are a popular dish around the world.

Did you know that the word ‘enchilada’ comes from the Spanish verb ‘enchilar’ which means ‘to add chili’. So the name could basically be translated as ‘chili-fied’!

Egg drop soup

This is another staple of Chinese restaurants. It is made by whisking raw eggs into a vegetable or chicken broth. This creates delicate egg ribbons in a warming comforting soup. We actually have an egg drop soup recipe you should try

A bowl of eggdrop soup on a table | Hurry The Food Up

Egg foo young

Egg foo young is a Chinese style omelette, prepared with vegetables and meat. The name comes from Cantonese and translates as ‘hibiscus egg’ – though there is no hibiscus used to make it!

Eggplant parmesan

This is an Italian dish made of eggplant layered with parmesan, mozzarella, basil and tomato sauce. It is baked in the oven. A delicious cheesy treat!

Empanada

Empanadas are eaten across Spain and Latin America. They are usually made of pastry folded around a meat, cheese or tomato filling and either fried or baked.

Two empanadas, one cut in half, on a wooden plate with salad | Hurry The Food Up

Sweet Foods/Desserts

Eclairs

Eclairs are a French sweet made from choux pastry filled with custard cream and topped with fondant icing. The word eclair means ‘flash of lightning’. Some people think this name comes from the glistening of the icing on top, others believe it is because they are usually eaten in a flash!

Eccles cake

Eccles cakes come from Northern England, from Lancashire. They consist of currents wrapped in flaky pastry and occasionally topped with demerara sugar.

An eccles cake with a bite taken out of it and a cup of tea | Hurry The Food Up

Egg custard

Egg custard is a sweet sauce prepared with milk or cream and thickened with eggs. It can be made thin to pour over desserts or made thick and used as a cream filling.

Elephant ears

Elephant ears can refer to two different types of dessert! One is a circle of fried dough topped with powdered and/or cinnamon sugar. The other is French pastry made of puff pastry shaped like a heart (or elephant ears!). These are also known as palmiers.

An elephant ear pastry dusted with powdered sugar on a sheet of brown paper | Hurry The Food Up

Eton mess

This traditional English dessert is believed to have originated at the prestigious boys boarding school, Eton. It is made of a mixture of berries, usually strawberries and raspberries, mixed with crushed meringues and whipped cream.

Two glasses of eton mess on a tray with berries | Hurry The Food Up

Beverages

Espresso

An espresso is a concentrated form of coffee served in a shot. It is made by forcing pressurized water through finely ground coffee beans. The result is a thicker, more intense coffee with a lighter brown ‘crema’ on top.

Earl grey tea

Earl grey tea is a kind of flavored tea made from black tea infused with the oil of bergamot oranges!

Eggnog

Eggnog is a drink usually consumed at Christmas time. It is made with cream, sugar, egg yolks, and whipped egg whites. Spirits such as brandy, rum or whisky are often added.

Two glasses of eggnog on a a wooden chopping board | Hurry The Food Up
49 Foods That Start With E (I bet you can’t list them!)
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From funky fruits to surprising snacks, did you know there are at least 49 foods that start with E? Learn them all here!

Ingredients

Whole foods

  • Eggs
  • European Pear
  • Egg fruit
  • Emblica
  • Elephant Foot Yam
  • Egusi
  • Eddo
  • Emu Apple Fruit
  • Eastern Hawthorn Fruit
  • Ensete
  • Elderberry
  • Early Girl Tomato
  • Elephant Apple Fruit
  • Emu Berry Fruit
  • Eggplant
  • Elands Sour Fig
  • Earthnut peas
  • Enterprise Apple
  • Earlygold Mango
  • Ephedra
  • Edamame
  • Entawak
  • Etrog
  • Elephant Garlic
  • Evergreen Huckleberry
  • Endive
  • Edward Mango
  • Escarole
  • Eels

Processed Food

  • English Muffin
  • Edam
  • Emmental
  • Evaporated Milk
  • Elbow Macaroni

Prepared Dishes

  • Eggrolls
  • Escargots
  • Enchiladas
  • Egg Drop Soup
  • Egg Foo Young
  • Eggplant Parmesan
  • Empanadas

Sweet foods / desserts

  • Eclairs
  • Egg Custard
  • Elephant Ears
  • Eccles Cakes
  • Eton Mess

Beverages

  • Eggnog
  • Espresso
  • Earl Grey Tea
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I hope you enjoyed learning new foods that start with e! Let me know if I’ve missed any in the comments below.

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