How to Make Authentic Dukkah Seasoning | Hurry The Food Up

How to Make Authentic Dukkah in Four Easy Steps

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Dukkah spice mix in a bowl

Before we get into to the hows of Dukkah, let’s take a look at the whats. Every now and then a complete game-changer comes along, and Dukkah is one of them.

An incredible fusion of nuts, herbs, seeds and spices, it’s an easy to make mix that can completely revitalise and revolutionize more recipes than you can shake a blender at.

Dukkah is originally an Egyptian combo, and the word comes from the Arabic ‘to pound’, and that’s how it was originally made.

If you came here looking for Dukkah then you’ll probably know what to expect; if you came here by chance then you’re in for a treat.

The newest member of our kitchen squad, Jansen, brought Dukkah with him – and we were instantly convinced.

Dukkah Ingredients

The exact ingredients vary from recipe to recipe, though most have several items in common like sesame, cumin and nuts.

Known across the world in various guises it’s usually called Dukkah or Duqqa (and pronounced dook-a) and although the ingredients change from recipe to recipe, the following is the best one we’ve tried.

Here’s a list and photo of all your ingredients. Next time you visit a supermarket load up on them!

  • Hazelnuts
  • Almonds
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Fennel seeds
  • Coriander seeds
  • White sesame seeds
  • Black sesame seeds
  • Cumin
  • Black cumin
  • Green peppercorns
  • Sweet paprika powder
  • Sea salt
nuts, sesame, spices and other dukkah ingredients

What is Dukkah used for?

It only takes a few minutes to make, and it’s plethora of uses is wide – it’s fantastic for sprinkling over soups, salads or dips – but it’s an all time favourite with chunky bread and olive oil. In fact, ancient Egyptians were eating it thousands of years ago with hummus and bread!

Dukkah is vegan too, but you’d never notice. It also stores for a long time, so you can make a big batch and stick it in a jar, saving it for whenever you fancy spicing up a dish that’s missing something.

Because if it’s missing something, this dukkah is it.

How to Make Dukkah in Four Easy Steps

Toasting seeds and nuts in a pan

1. Gently roast the hazelnuts, almonds and sunflower seeds in a pan. About three minutes will do it. Take them out and pop them into a blender.

Toasting seeds and spices in a pan

2. Next, slowly roast the fennel seeds, normal cumin, coriander, and white sesame seeds. These won’t take as long – about two minutes should do it.

Nut, seed and spice mix in a blender
ut and seed

3. Put the second batch into the blender as well and just press the pulse button a couple of times. We’re looking for a nice crunchy mix here, not a powder.

Finally add the sea salt, black sesame seeds, black cumin, green pepper and paprika powder. Give it a last quick blend.

A jar of Egyptian spice mix

4. Put it all in airtight glass. Done!

Use it to intensify soups, dips and salads or treat yourself to an oily bread and dukkah. You won’t look back.

Health Benefits

Dukkah provides a punchy blend of nutrients, thanks to the nuts and seeds that make up the bulk of the recipe.

By now we all know how beneficial nuts are as part of a vegetarian diet (and any diet for that matter!) In our easy dukkah recipe we use a mix of almonds and hazelnuts, both of which are high in healthy fats, dietary fibre and protein. Nuts can help you to feel fuller for longer and both hazelnuts and almonds contain oleic acid, which helps your body to burn fat.

They also contain a blend of vitamin E which can strengthen the immune system and maintain healthy eyes, and niacin (vitamin B3) which helps us release energy from the food we eat and can support nervous system function. 

Seeds are packed full of healthy fats and fibre. In our recipe you’ll find a mix of super-seeds including sunflower seeds which are rich in B vitamins and sesame seeds which are known for their high vitamin E and calcium levels.

Dipping bread into oil and then dukkah

What our Readers are Saying

Wow!!! finally made a batch -forgot the black sesame seeds and put 1 tbsp of coconut sugar too – and the divine smell from first the frying pan and then from the blender mixing warmed and roasted goodies! This all resulted in a wide grin on my face, oriental scent in my kitchen and naturally drooling all over anticipating dukkah-coated chicken breast fillets tonight! The ready made dukkah-blends cost a fortune at a special boutiques and this took less than 10 minutes to prepare! Cost is next to nothing considering how many batches one can make of the ingredients! Thanks so much for this recipe 🙂

Elisa ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Made this Dukkah its really good! thanks for the recipe 🙂

Liz ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

I’m so glad I found this recipe. WONDERFUL. A huge THANK YOU for crafting this wonderful, delicious spice blend.

Mary EO ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Egyptian Spice Mix FAQ’s

Is dukkah spicy?

Dukkah is definitely not spicy hot, but the blend we suggest above gives it more of a warming hint of spice.

Is dukkah the same as za’atar?

No, although they have similar uses they are different in flavour as Za’atar recipes often feature thyme, toasted sesame seeds, and sumac. 

How long does dukkah keep?

It’ll last a good few weeks as long as the jar is airtight (although we often find it’s all gone by then 😉 )

Is it vegan?

Yes, our dukkah recipe is completely vegan.

Can I substitute the green peppercorns?

Yes, we realise these may be a little tricky to find everywhere, so you could also use white or black pepper if you can’t find green peppercorns.

How to Make Authentic Dukkah in Four Easy Steps - take your spices to the next level | hurrythefoodup.com
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4.86 from 21 votes

Authentic Egyptian Dukkah

Make some authentic Dukkah! Take your spices to the next level with this Egyptian classic – perfect any dish with this outstanding herb combo!
Course Dip, Snack
Cuisine Egyptian
Time 10 minutes
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 1 big jar
Calories 992kcal

Ingredients

Instructions 

  • Gently roast the hazelnuts, almonds and sunflower seeds in a pan. About three minutes will do it. Take them out and pop them into a blender.
  • Next, slowly roast the fennel seeds, normal cumin, coriander, and white sesame seeds. These won’t take as long – about two minutes should do it.
  • Put the second batch into the blender as well and just press the pulse button a couple of times. We’re looking for a nice crunchy mix here, not a powder. Finally add the green pepper, sea salt, black sesame seeds, black cumin and paprika powder and give it a last quick blend.
  • Put it all in an airtight glass. Done! Use it to intensify soups, dips and salads or treat yourself to an oily bread and dukkah. You won’t look back.

Notes

IF YOU LIKED THIS RECIPE: find something awesome to sprinkle it on! Anything goes – whether it’s this Creamy Broccoli Pasta, this Vegan Potato Soup or even this High Protein White Bean Dip. Have fun!
Please note that the nutritional chart included is for the entire jar, and would be roughly 32 tbsp.
 
Jansen – thanks a lot for bringing some Egyptian flavours into our kitchen. What a cool recipe!

Nutrition

Nutrition Facts
Authentic Egyptian Dukkah
Amount Per Serving
Calories 992 Calories from Fat 756
% Daily Value*
Fat 84g129%
Saturated Fat 8g50%
Sodium 2359mg103%
Potassium 1514mg43%
Carbohydrates 51g17%
Fiber 27g113%
Sugar 4g4%
Protein 30g60%
Vitamin A 3580IU72%
Vitamin C 6.9mg8%
Calcium 841mg84%
Iron 21.7mg121%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
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About Dave

From the UK to Germany with many stops along the way. Food without meat is the best type of food. And I plan to share it!

37 comments

  1. I would love to try this soon. Looks so good.

  2. 5 stars
    made this Dukkah its really good! thanks for the recipe 🙂

  3. This looks great! May I ask if by ‘green pepper’ you are referring to a green bell pepper or some kind of spice? Also, any idea of the calorie count? Thank you!

    • Hi JoAnn! With the green pepper we actually mean green peppercorns (I’ve just changed the recipe to show that more clearly), but you could also use white or black pepper if you can’t find green. With regards to a calorie count, if we say there about 32 tbsp in a jar, and the jar is 992 calories, then we’re looking at about 31 cal per tbsp. I hope that helps! 🙂

  4. 5 stars
    Wow!!! finally made a batch -forgot the black sesame seeds and put 1 tbsp of coconut sugar too – and the divine smell from first the frying pan and then from the blender mixing warmed and roasted goodies! This all resulted in a wide grin on my face, oriental scent in my kitchen and naturally drooling all over anticipating dukkah-coated chicken breast fillets tonight! The ready made dukkah-blends cost a bloody fortune at a special boutiques and this took less than 10 minutes to prepare! Cost is next to nothing considering how many batches one can make of the ingredients! Thanks so much for this recipe 🙂

  5. 5 stars
    This is an absolutely delicious mix, although I only had a few hazelnuts in the pantry so topped up the quantity with pistachios and macadamias.

  6. How long will it keep in the jar?

  7. Just made a double batch. I have a friend I share recipes with and thought I’d introduce her to this one. I’ve already had a generous sprinkling on avocado toast and on half a baked sweet potato. I’m in heaven. Thank you so much for sharing this amazing recipe!

  8. Can the fennel seeds be left out?
    I hate anything that tastes of liquorice.

  9. It appears there are two different types of spice referred to as black cumin… Which one have you used?

    Thanks

    • Hi Alexander, wow I had no idea there were two. Today I learned something new. We used Nigella sativa. Thanks for the question, and hope that helps!

  10. 4 stars
    I made this with most of the ingredients listed. I did t have the black sesame or the black cumin. I really enjoyed it, it’s quite addictive. I made a second batch and added caraway and fresh orange zest (I dont think that’s traditional). The orange zest really lifted it and gave it a whole other dimension. This is going on my holiday appetizer table for sure!

    • Haha yes, it really is addictive! I love having a jar of the stuff around. The orange zest sounds really nice! Really cool, especially if you’re going to use it up quickly 🙂

  11. 5 stars
    I’m so glad I found this recipe. WONDERFUL. A huge THANK YOU for crafting this wonderful, delicious spice blend.

  12. 5 stars
    Love the videos and would love the recipe for Chili sin and the quesadilla. Dukkah is a household g]favourite but oh so expensive in the shops! I look forward to trying your recipe. Many thanks

  13. How much does this yield?

  14. Can you freeze Dukkah when you make it & there’s only one of you to eat it?

  15. 5 stars
    I made your Dukkah recipe at Christmas last year. Gave away jars of it and added it to my shortbread and chocolate bark as well. It was such a huge hit! One of my friends calls it her crack and adds it to everything! Thank you for such an amazing recipe!

  16. Hi there, first time I try to make a Dukkah .. will make it again! Great recipe! Though i feel silly to ask this, but mine turned red because of the Paprika as the photo seems to be yellow? So next time i will try to put some Turmeric (but not as much as a table spoon of course)
    Thank you for sharing the recipe!

    • Glad you enjoyed it, MC! I think it’s fine there was a red tinge (unless it was maybe too much paprika?). Haha yes, definitely less than a tsp of turmeric, but should still be great! 🙂

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